About

Expats share a number of general things in common but there’s one thing they all share by definition: they are living and setting up life in a country that is not the same as the country on their passport. They have uprooted themselves from their familiar life, packed up what’s left of their possessions into suitcases, and embarked on a new life and journey on foreign soil.

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The rewarding experiences one gains from living life overseas can sometimes be crowded out by the inevitable struggles that come with the full, expat-life package. Whether it’s learning a new language, enduring culture shock, coming to grips that you stick out like a sore thumb, learning how to bargain for everything, or figuring out how to cook all over again because you can’t quite stomach all the new types of food –we want you to know that you’re not alone in your struggles.

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All expats, no matter what country they live in, long for a community where they can talk and share with other people who “get it”. This blog, ‘Taking Route’, provides that type of community for those living overseas. The title of this blog is a play-on-words that sums up the two major steps all expats take: taking a route to a new location and then settling down and taking root. The latter can sometimes be difficult when a feeling of loneliness is ever-present.

That’s why we, a growing team of writers who have logged a number of years living overseas ourselves, want to utilize this little corner of the web as a spot for expats of all regions of the world to come together and share stories, pass along recipes, laugh at cultural mess-ups, inform others of travel tips, share advice on raising TCKs, and ultimately interact and encourage one another as one, big expat family who understand one another.

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Maybe you’re a newbie expat. Maybe you’ve lived overseas longer than you’ve lived in your passport country. Maybe you haven’t even made the big move yet and you’re seeking to learn more about what your adventurous life will look like. To all of you we say, welcome to ‘Taking Route’! We encourage interaction. Leave comments on posts, follow us on Facebook, subscribe to this blog (see right sidebar) and share about this online community with others who might benefit from it! On the left sidebar, you can link up your personal blog (if you have one) by selecting the region you live in as an expat.

We would love to hear from you! If there is a topic you would like to read about please let us know. Also, if you are interested in being a contributor or guest writer here at ‘Taking Route’, send a message to our editors, Denise and Kimberlynn.

Our email: takingroute {at} gmail {dot} com

Denise James and Kimberlynn Boyce

co-editors of Taking Route

 

Photo Credit: killerturnip via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Tambako the Jaguar via Compfight cc

21 thoughts on “About

  1. Hey, just found this site. Love it! Just moved (home?) to Indonesia, where I am now raising my own Indonesian TCKs.

    • I am so glad that you found us. Raising little TCK’a is a fun job! Let us know if you have any suggestions or topics that would be helpful.

  2. We spent 12 years overseas; all 3 kids born overseas, and we are now back in the U.S.. Love this site. My heart resonates with the article “I See You”. I have been surprised at the reverse culture shock which continues even though we’ve been back in the U.S. for 3 years now. I continue to raise my kids as TCKs, and at times I think I’m an TCA–third culture adult–for I do not feel “home” in my passport country and actually don’t want to feel at home, and I’m constantly looking for people of other cultures to engage. Great job with a site like this to support expats.

    • Living overseas definitely changes you in ways you never expected. We haven’t been back to the States yet since moving overseas and sometimes I get nervous about returning. Not that I don’t have days where I just can’t wait to return back to familiar territory…but sometimes I wonder if it will still be as familiar to me as it once was, you know? Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Missy!

  3. Moved from Switzerland to Australia just under 10 years ago… with one kid and a dog and then discovered in Down Under that child number 2 was on her way… Sometimes it still feels like I am trying to settle and sometimes it feels like I have truly settled down here. But who knows where life will lead us. Maybe we stay (as we will get our citizenship soon), but maybe it will lead us to another country again.

  4. Great site, I wish I had of stumbled across this 10 years ago when I moved to Singapore at 18 by myself. Also I love the photo of the fried crickets…they are delish!

  5. I am glad a friend of mine posted a link to your site on fb. I lived overseas for thirteen years and my children were born overseas. We are back in the states now because of illness that I am now recovered from. I am experiencing reverse culture shock and long to return to my adopted country, but am torn between that and my extended family in my passport country.

  6. Hi great to see this site. Living in Asia for the 21st year as empty-nesters after having raised our 3 children (now grown and living all over the world) in 6 different city/small town Asian locations. This is a wonderful support system. So glad you are here.

    • Glad to meet you Martha! Hopefully we can continue to grow the archives of Taking Route to be helpful for expats in all walks of life. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment 🙂

  7. I am glad I have found this blog! I am planning to go for few months to Japan because I feel
    like I need to go there. sometimes staying in your passport country can be suffocating. you don’t really feel
    like you belong there.
    anyhow! i am looking forward to reading your posts and hopefully to engage with anyone who is in Japan right now or elsewhere!
    good luck!

  8. I’m 24 and have lived in Luxembourg, Russian (3 separate times) and Australia and am now back in my native Scotland for a while. To be honest, I feel that each one is one of my homes and whenever I move on I feel homesick for each place I have lived and for the friends, customs and language(s) that I leave behind. And equally, I am foreign in all of those places, having picked up customs from each of the other places (Offer to show someone in Scotland your thong tan line and just watch the horror on their faces 😛 )

  9. I can’t believe I just found this site! I’m Japanese-Brazilian, a TCK through and through having grown up in the US and Europe. I’m still an expat, in Singapore at the moment and probably looking to go somewhere else next – but where?!

  10. Kimberlynn,

    I just found a blog post from you translated in Russian and I wanted to read the original and found this site! Really enjoyed your blog post and this site is really cool! I have been an expat for the last 7 years. I have always wanted to start a blog and share my experiences so I have been encouraged trough this site to pursue this desire. Keep up the good work!

    Elena

    • Wow! It’s been translated into Russian? That’s fun. I’m glad you found your way over here to Taking Route. And you should definitely start sharing your experiences! The expat community grows stronger when we’re able to read and relate to one another’s stories 🙂

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